Wimminz Takes Credit For Man’s Work

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A wimminz named Katie Bouman has been constantly in the news for several days, touted as the groundbreaking genius who brought us the first image of a black hole. CNN reported that Bouman “led the creation of an algorithm,” which makes it sound like it was her personal project.

It turns out that Katie didn’t “lead” anything. She was just a bit player on the team. The individual who did nearly all the development work, on the software which allowed for the imaging, was a man named Andrew Chael.

When people started talking about this strange phenomenon, Chael got on twitter, to white knight for m’lady. He must have typed his denouncement of all us misogynists stream-of-consciousness, because in his defense, he confirmed the fact that he was, in fact, the “primary developer” of the software in question.

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Thanks, Andrew, for telling us what we knew already.

Author: Boxer

Sinister All-Male Dancer. Secret King of all Gamma Males. Member of Frankfurt School. Your Fave Contrarian!

8 thoughts on “Wimminz Takes Credit For Man’s Work”

  1. It turns out that Katie didn’t “lead” anything. She was just a bit player on the team. The individual who did nearly all the development work, on the software which allowed for the imaging, was a man named Andrew Chael.

    Feminist clown world ranging from academia to media to churchianity keeps trying to push the inverted narrative that women lead and men are the helpers…but the truth eventually comes out that it’s the other way around and always has been.

  2. I did see this story in the news. I didn’t see that Chael was okay with his accomplishment being stolen. The Farce is strong with this one!

  3. Further attempts at obfuscation give the public a more accurate picture of the fraud:

    Chael said in the thread, “Our papers used three independent imaging software libraries (including one developed by my friend [Kazu Akiyama]). While I wrote much of the code for one of these pipelines, Katie was a huge contributor to the software; it would have never worked without her contributions and the work of many others who wrote code, debugged and figured out how to use the code on challenging EHT data. With a few others, Katie also developed the imaging framework that rigorously tested all three codes and shaped the entire paper.”
    https://www.wkyc.com/article/news/verify/507-a75119eb-2dd5-4e26-bb10-3231dc3c1215

    All of that is almost certainly true. Such accomplishments are almost never the work of a single individual. Even so, why was Katie the only one splashed across the feminist media? Why do we have thousands of photos of Katie burned into our minds, rather than an acknowledgement of the team she was on?

  4. New is a business, not a philosopher looking for truth.

    With 24/7 news reporting these days, all the news that’s fit to print has turned into all the information that will draw eyes and ears, so that we might charge our advertisers more

    The only solution to that truth is to read widely and deeply – as the folks who have posted here have done. The “truth” lies in comparing many different stories about the same issue. A better picture will then emerge, just like it has done in this thread.

  5. Boxer wrote: “Even so, why was Katie the only one splashed across the feminist media? Why do we have thousands of photos of Katie burned into our minds, rather than an acknowledgement of the team she was on?”

    I think it is because it fits the politically correct view: the idea of a woman playing a major role in a STEM accomplishment would show that a woman can be successful in the STEM world, and thus be a tremendous role model for young girls to aspire to follow.

    What I find especially interesting is that they did this with a young, fairly attractive, white woman. I wonder if they hoped her physically attractive qualities would help overcome the sexism they presume. In other words, it’s okay to objectify women if it works to their advantage.

    They (the media, politicians, feminist organizations) wanted to spin this situation further to show she was at least one of the leaders of the project, if not the primary leader.

    When this was not accepted (in fact, shown to be untrue), they had to cover their asses and deflect. It must be sexism, they said, and even doubled down on why. A typical response can be found at vox&#46com (Male scientists are often cast as lone geniuses….), where it says:

    “… the reaction to Bouman’s picture reveals hostility many women scientists face all the time. Lastly, to combat this hostility, we need to see more images of women thriving in science.”

    The goal is to shift the paradigm. For me, I think the whole project is way overblown. The fire at Notre Dame Cathedral is far more significant than seeing a clear image of a black hole.

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