Our Man Michael

jacksonI was never a huge Michael Jackson fan, partly because I grew up in Canada, and as was the custom in that shithole, I used to listen to old Skinny Puppy records. The only real alternative was Avril Lavigne.

I realize now that I never gave Jackson’s music a fair chance, and this was probably because of my perception of his personality. The race-change operation, combined with widespread suspicion that he was a pervert, ruined it for me. You might say I chose Skinny Puppy not mainly out of national chauvinism, but because they were objectively less bizarre. At least, that’s what I thought, before this week.

Skinny Puppy was before my time… roughly concurrent with Michael Jackson’s solo career in the U.S.. Like Brother Michael, who did his own thing after his departure from the Jackson 5, Skinny Puppy broke up. All the members have solo acts. The one I tend to follow today is OhGr.

In 2011, I bought OhGr’s most recent album. For whatever reason, I ripped it with iTunes but didn’t get around to listening to it. I finally realized I had it kicking around by chance, when I was going through my ipod, on a city bus. The album opens with the 911 call that was made by Jackson’s personal assistant, after our man Michael was already dead at the hands of his dope-peddling doctor. The red flags in that conversation are so numerous that one begins to wonder all sorts of shit.

Press play to pay respects, and listen closely. That call happened exactly nine years ago. It is the stuff that conspiracy theories are made of.

Jackson died at the end of a long and well-publicized court battle, with prosecutors alleging that he had kidnapped and raped a young boy. The jury found Jackson not guilty on all counts. Some time after the trial, his accuser’s mother pled guilty a perjury charge, in connection with another legal action in which the family tried to shake down another celebrity for money. The same family who had attempted to extort a living from the king of pop, also attempted as much with Jay Leno, Chris Tucker, The J.C. Penney corporation, and numerous others.

Despite being a pop star, Jackson was a shy fella with a lifelong interest in religion. He was born a Jehovah’s Witness, but didn’t seem to find that a hindrance to exposure to other ideas. I don’t know whether Jackson ever officially converted to Judaism, but he was friends with a rabbi named Shmuley Boteach (pronounced Bo-tox). Boteach released a book, entitled The Michael Jackson Tapes, in which are transcribed selections of Jackson’s confessions.

In the first place, the book surprised me simply due to its context. I don’t know what Jewish law entails, but if there isn’t a general ethical rule that says a man’s rabbi can’t publish a book containing his confessions, there really ought to be. That aside, Jackson makes a number of stunning observations in the book.

About his abortive 1991 relationship with Madonna, Jackson says…

“She is not a nice person,” Jackson told Boteach. Jackson revealed how he and Madonna had bickered about where they would socialize.

“Madonna laid the law down to me before we went out. [She said] I am not going to Disneyland, OK? That’s out,” Jackson said. “I said, ‘I didn’t ask to go to Disneyland.’

She said, ‘We are going to the restaurant. And afterwards, we are going to a strip bar.’ “I said, ‘I am not going to a strip bar, where they cross dress. … I am not going to there. If that’s how it is, forget this whole thing. … Afterwards, she wrote some mean things about me in the press. And I wrote that she is a nasty witch, after I was so kind to her,” Jackson said.

Apparently Jackson wasn’t degenerate enough to stay in Madonna’s good graces.

(Then again, who is?)

Jackson had some very nuanced ideas about females. He loved women, always speaking well of his mother, and a few other solid sisters he knew personally. Like every decent man should, though, Jackson hated wimminz.

Boteach said Jackson simultaneously held women in reverence and awe yet harbored deep suspicions about their motivations and his perceived their use of sexuality to achieve their goals.

Jackson: “Women can do some things that make guys very unhappy. I see it with my brothers. I see my brothers crying in tears and pulling the grass out of the lawn out of frustration because of their wives.”

Boteach: “Do you think all their wives were interested more in their success than in them?”

Jackson: “Absolutely. They were after their money. That’s why I said to myself, ‘I’ll never be married.’ I held out the longest. I stayed at home until I was 27, 28.”

Boteach: “What was part of the attraction to Lisa Marie? That she had her own money? She had her own fame. You knew it wasn’t about any of that.”

Jackson: “Absolutely. She didn’t take a penny, didn’t want anything.”

Like most child celebrities, raised in the praxis prism which is the typical Hollywood film lot, Jackson came to adulthood with some very serious issues. Be that as it may, he tried to warn us, in his songs, about the dangers of wimminz and feminism. The establishment and its corporate media repaid him for this noble act, by spreading the meme that he was a homosexual pedophile and a dangerous predator. I realize, after doing less than an hour of research, that I had been suckered, like a typical SJW halfwit, into believing this nonsense.

Jackson died of a drug overdose, administered by his shady doctor, who has since been charged with murder. Had our man Michael lived, who knows what truths he would have told…

michael-jackson-child-star-raw
1958.08.29 (Gary IN) – 2009.06.25 (Los Angeles CA)

Author: Boxer

Sinister All-Male Dancer. Secret King of all Gamma Males. Member of Frankfurt School. Your Fave Contrarian!

13 thoughts on “Our Man Michael”

  1. Growing up in the midwest, 1980’s America, I can tell you, Jackson was definitely the king of pop. No one else, not even Prince or Madonna, could compare to his electrifying stage presence. His music, dance moves, and fashion styles were ubiquitous.

    I have long believed that the powers-that-be continually tried to frame Jackson in various schemes as attempts to coerce his narrative-wayward stances on social politics. Same goes for a few other top stars, like Elvis, Lennon, Cobain, Holly, Hutchinson…

  2. And of course he didn’t have the best fatherly influence as well which could explain why he was trying to find love either through fame, children, or women…that seems to be a common theme.

    ‘He had great difficulty showing affection. He never really told me he loved me. And he never really complimented me either. If I did a great show, he would only tell me it was a good show. And if I did an okay show, he told me it was a lousy show. He seemed intent above all else on making us a commercial success. And at that he was more than adept. My father was a managerial genius and my brothers and I owe our professional success in no small measure to the foreceful way he pushed us. He trained me as a showman and under his guidance, I couldn’t miss a step.

    But what I really wanted was a Dad. I wanted a father who showed me love. And my father never did that. He never said ‘I love you’ whilst looking me straight in the eye, he never played a game with me, he never gave me a piggyback ride, he never threw a pillow at me.’

    Among the book’s other revelations:

    — Seeing Britney Spears on his hotel television, Jackson said, “I don’t believe that she’ll have any great longevity in the public eye because she doesn’t understand the power of mystery.”

    — Actress Brooke Shields was one of the loves of his life. Jackson said they dated “a lot” and that he had pictures of her all over his walls. After meeting her at the Academy Awards and exchanging numbers, he went home and stayed up all night singing and “spinning around in my room” out of joy.

    — MJ claimed his father, who has denied ever beating his son, would make him strip down, then Joseph would oil up his body and hit him with the cord from an iron on the face and back.

    — As children, he and sister Janet would play a game where they would picture Joseph dead in a coffin and discuss how they did not feel sorry for his pretend death.’

  3. I was in sixth / seventh grade when “Thriller” peaked (1983 / 1984). You couldn’t get away from it, and I hated it. When “Bad” came out at the end of 1987…….I wanted to puke.

    That whole “Lisa Marie” thing in the early 1990’s and the song from “Free Willy” combined with that one Oprah interview………yeah sure Michael……..”rare skin disease that has no name” sure Michael. Not buying it.

    At the end of the 1980’s I got into “soul / Motown / classic R&B / Northern Soul” and really discovered Michael Jackson’s talent with “The Jackson 5” from the first wave and string of monster hits from about 1970-1974. I knew about ‘The Jackson 5’ before this….but I really understood it after this point, and I became a pretty solid fan of his work form this period. Actually a big one. “Keeping The Faith” here.

    He was good. Really good. He was a kid. Thrust into the spotlight very quickly. A very tender age too. A tyrant father (like Murray Wilson, dad of three of the ‘Beach Boys’). Exposed to a world few knew and fewer lived. The ‘Jackson 5’ was a good group. All of them. It worked…..but it would not have been a quarter as famous without Michale’s searing talent, voice, demeanor. This can have a terrible impact on a child……….I am not excusing some of his more strange anti-social behaviors (Quincy Jones even said after his death, shaking his head in sadness…..”Michael was a drug addict, for a long, long time….long before this trial”) and the press is full of these stories from over the decades……….

    When he died. I was not in shock. I was not crying. I wasn’t even sad. I just said, “Brother man finally will have some quiet. What a life. Amazing. Tragic, confusing, and sad.”

    On general principles, I won’t read anything from this book. He had an amzing impact, a lasting one……..and it’s really sad that he is gone.

    Here is probably my fav Jackson 5 track. From 1972……..

  4. Wayne @ 1:52 am:
    Growing up in the midwest, 1980’s America, I can tell you, Jackson was definitely the king of pop. No one else, not even Prince or Madonna, could compare to his electrifying stage presence. His music, dance moves, and fashion styles were ubiquitous.

    I have long believed that the powers-that-be continually tried to frame Jackson in various schemes as attempts to coerce his narrative-wayward stances on social politics. Same goes for a few other top stars, like Elvis, Lennon, Cobain, Holly, Hutchinson”

    Nah. Elvis was ruined by a greedy manager who pushed him too hard, too fast. Lennon was a liberal nutjob anyway. Cobain was a serious drug user. Don’t know about the others but I doubt they were saints pushed off a cliff.

    Our enemy is less a cabal of tyrants than human nature unleashed, subsidized and weaponized.

    seventiesjason @ 8:30 am:
    “He was good. Really good. He was a kid. Thrust into the spotlight very quickly. A very tender age too. A tyrant father (like Murray Wilson, dad of three of the ‘Beach Boys’). Exposed to a world few knew and fewer lived.”

    It turned him into the freak he was. An extreme case of arrested development. The fact that Michael Jackson candidly admitted to sleeping with kids (in the same bed, not sexually) and continued to do so was good evidence he was mentally ill rather than criminal. I always figured that was why he was never prosecuted.

    Real pedos try to hide their deeds.

  5. Pop stars achieve success thru blue pill theorizing (hit songs) plus red pill experience (groupies), two things that are mutually irreconcilable. No wonder they take drugs and die young.

    Never felt anything whatsoever for MJ until now. Thanks a lot. I seek for my own children anonymity and mediocrity for their own good.

  6. John Lennon was a very, very complex man. His will left a grip of money for the NYC Salvation Army…….Lennon was famous for always just “tellin’ it like he saw it”

    and it seemed to piss off everyone at some point in his varried life as a Beatle and post-Beatlehood. Was it Drugs? Yoko? Yoko? Yoko? No father? Jaded cynicism?

    Unanswerable….

    But I DO get Wayne. Even today the media is telling US what “john would have done or said” in situations today.

    Sure, he pissed off Christians in 1966 for that comment about Jesus…..he also REALLY pissed off the left in 1971 when he stated “You’re all sayin;’ tear down Wall Street. Fine. Great. Replace it with what? How will it work and how will it be vaible? What’s the plan? We have “Apple” and its been a bigger nightmare and problem in my life than anything that has been thrown at me….”

  7. Lennon…another example of a boy who had a mostly absent father and his mother got impregnanted by another man while his father was away. He was ruined by feminism and the destruction of his family. I think there’s a trend here.

    His own words:

    ‘In September 1980, Lennon commented about his family and his rebellious nature:

    Part of me would like to be accepted by all facets of society and not be this loudmouthed lunatic poet/musician. But I cannot be what I am not … I was the one who all the other boys’ parents—including Paul’s father—would say, ‘Keep away from him’… The parents instinctively recognised I was a troublemaker, meaning I did not conform and I would influence their children, which I did. I did my best to disrupt every friend’s home … Partly out of envy that I didn’t have this so-called home … but I did… There were five women that were my family. Five strong, intelligent, beautiful women, five sisters. One happened to be my mother. [She] just couldn’t deal with life. She was the youngest and she had a husband who ran away to sea and the war was on and she couldn’t cope with me, and I ended up living with her elder sister. Now those women were fantastic … And that was my first feminist education … I would infiltrate the other boys’ minds. I could say, “Parents are not gods because I don’t live with mine and, therefore, I know.”

  8. I’d bet most of your major music industry types have the same background.

  9. To clarify what I wrote above about desiring “mediocrity” for my children, I don’t mean a lack of excellence or of striving for self-improvement. I mean mediocrity as in a contentment with their own affairs, in contrast with being driven by some need for attention or fame for its own sake. If fame comes as a result, then so be it. The Preacher saith, “Seest thou a man diligent in his business? he shall stand before kings; he shall not stand before mean men” (Prov. 22:29).

  10. Boxer, I’ve been reading your blog for a while. So in answer to your question about Shmuley Boteach, yes, it is forbidden under Jewish law for a Rabbi to reveal anything told to him when he is acting as a Rabbi, giving spiritual guidance etc. With limited exceptions.

  11. McCarney Sr. (Pauls’s father) was a single dad btw…….Paul’s mom died when he was a young lad.

  12. Welcome Brother.

    Yes, it is forbidden under Jewish law for a Rabbi to reveal anything told to him when he is acting as a Rabbi, giving spiritual guidance etc. With limited exceptions.

    I’m sorta conflicted. The tell-all was ten bucks, and I paid it; so, clearly I’m not holier than thou. That aside, I wonder how Boteach rationalizes spilling this sort of dirt on a dead man.

    I’ve always assumed that seeing a clergyman in a professional setting was similar to seeing an attorney or a physician. You go to these people for advice, and you need to feel a high level of confidence that you can dump all the unseemly details, without the world finding out.

    Best,

    Boxer

  13. I’ll spare you the internal Jewish politics because it would probably bore you. But Boteach has crossed the line many times in regards to Jewish law. He’s never been formally excommunicated, but he did lose his position as the Shaliach to Oxford. He is smart, and Charismatic, but he seems able to justify anything that furthers his status.

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